The Arolsen Archives are committed to remembering Nazi persecution, the Holocaust and the effects of these crimes. Millions of documents on the victims of National Socialism provide the basis for the work we do. The original documents are kept safe and sound in state-of-the-art archive boxes, but the contents have to be made public. We organize international projects, exhibitions and campaigns to draw attention to the far-reaching importance of our holdings. Examples of our activities include the exhibition on our own history as well as social media campaigns and special exhibitions.

#StolenMemory: personal possessions of concentration camp inmates

Since 1962, our archive has stored photos, watches, wallets, jewelry and other personal items belonging to concentration camp inmates. It isn’t easy to find the families of the people who owned them. To find out more about this campaign and the resulting exhibition, go to #StolenMemory

A paper monument

Now recognized by the UNESCO as part of the world’s documentary heritage, the documents held in the archive were once a source of hope to people looking for lost relatives after the war. Our permanent exhibition shows how the work of the institution has changed over time, describes the significance of this work then and now and tells the story of how the documents came to Bad Arolsen in the first place. The exhibition opened in June 2019 and throws light on the history of the Arolsen Archives.