A new exhibition container will soon be setting off on a #StolenMemory traveling exhibition tour – thanks to a generous gift of $100,000. We are very grateful to the United States Department of State and to the US embassies in Berlin and Warsaw for their valuable support! The additional container will be shown in eastern Germany and Poland.

“This support means a lot to us,” emphasizes Director of the Arolsen Archives, Floriane Azoulay. “Thanks to the generosity of our American friends, we will now be able to reach more people with our educational work and raise awareness of our efforts to return property that was stolen by the Nazis,” explained Azoulay. Receiving this donation from the US embassies in Berlin and Warsaw “is also a very special honor for us and a great pleasure,” Azoulay continued. The Arolsen Archives expressed their special thanks to Cherrie Daniels, the US State Department’s Special Envoy for Holocaust issues, who worked hard to arrange the donation. She represents America on our institution’s International Commission and began her one-year stint as Chair in June 2020.

German-American cooperation

The support for the #StolenMemory traveling exhibition was announced on the day of the recent meeting between US Secretary of State Antony Blinken and his German counterpart Heiko Maas. During the visit, the two governments agreed to enter into a more intensive exchange of ideas in future about strategies to promote Holocaust education.

100.000 dollars for #StolenMemory on Tour*
*This donation enables us to build a third exhibition container and send it on its way.
Floriane Azoulay

»Thanks to the generosity of our American friends, we will now be able to reach more people with our educational work and raise awareness of our efforts to return mementoes to victims’ families.«

Floriane Azoulay, Director of the Arolsen Archives

 

Documents for the US Secretary of State

On his visit to Germany, US Secretary of State Antony Blinken received copies of all the documents held in the Arolsen Archives that relate to the persecution of his stepfather, Samuel Pisar. Pisar was born in Poland in 1929 and survived forced labor and several concentration camps. Shortly before the Allied victory over Nazi Germany, he and a number of other prisoners escaped from one of the infamous death marches that would normally have taken him to the Dachau concentration camp. A short time later, he was picked up by US soldiers and came under their care. The copies that have now been handed over to the US Secretary of State will give him an insight into some aspects of Samuel Pisar’s persecution.

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